Writing Exercises: Writing it Out (Skim & Wounded Attachments)

Below the cut is an example of the messy, imperfect work of writing. If you’re new around here, you should know that I use this space to help organise my brain when writing my dissertation, and also to keep my writing muscles moving when I’m stalled out on other projects. What I’m doing here (and in the next few posts, actually) is basically free writing, but free writing in an attempt to help me sort out how to articulate a connection that I need to bridge two sections of the chapter I’m working on. Also, the writing under the cut is currently incomplete, but I’m posting it in order to feel like I’m getting things done. You know, for motivation. I’ll indicate when it’s edited/closer to complete.
Oh. Here’s a picture of the inside of my face:
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Continue reading “Writing Exercises: Writing it Out (Skim & Wounded Attachments)”

Writing Exercises: Writing it Out (Skim & Wounded Attachments)

Notes on Monica Chiu’s “A Moment Outside of Time,” from her book Drawing New Color Lines

Below the cut, find my notes on Monica Chiu’s “A Moment Outside of Time,” which is a chapter on Tamaki and Tamaki’s Skim, and can be found in her collection Drawing New Color Lines. I’m putting my notes under the cut because they are boring as shit to anyone who isn’t me (obv), but you might be interested n my note-taking strategy. I picked up this strategy in a graduate class, and used it all of the way through my comps. It’s super simple: distill notes for each text down to a single page by focusing on keyword (brief definitions in plain language, with page numbers for reference where applicable), a summary of the text’s main argument (four sentences or less- an excellent skill to practice), and notes & questions (max four). Anyway: notes.
Continue reading “Notes on Monica Chiu’s “A Moment Outside of Time,” from her book Drawing New Color Lines”

Notes on Monica Chiu’s “A Moment Outside of Time,” from her book Drawing New Color Lines

Tips for staying on track in your writing from a woman who is currently on track in her writing (but isn’t always)

I’m writing a dissertation. In the Humanities. It’s a big project, and a very specific kind of writing. I don’t think it’s easier or harder than other kinds of writing, but I do think there are a few challenges particular to the territory. Personally, I’ve struggled with the persistent lack of deadlines. I’m also currently managing a whole new level of stress that is tied to my funding (or, actually, my lack of funding) for my fifth year. Anyway, all of that aside, here are some strategies that have helped me to get on track in my progress (even I get off-track fairly often).
(This post is pretty personal, and pretty boring. Here’s a picture I quite like, and the rest of the post is under the cut.)
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Continue reading “Tips for staying on track in your writing from a woman who is currently on track in her writing (but isn’t always)”

Tips for staying on track in your writing from a woman who is currently on track in her writing (but isn’t always)